Hey what’s up guys, it’s Nick from Fit Futures here with yet another answer to yet another question.

Today’s question comes from Alex up here in Auckland and Alex just asked; ‘Nick, I travel a lot for work, is there anything I can be doing exercise wise in my hotel room?’

 Awesome question. In fact, there’s actually a book on this subject, to a certain degree, called Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy. Feel free to check it out, I didn’t write it but it’s a very good book nonetheless and it illustrates a whole bunch of things that you can do that are bodyweight incorporating chairs, and poofs, and bands, and all sorts of cool stuff so I definitely recommend that you check that book out if you can get your hands on it. But to answer your question, yeah there’s tonnes that you can do. Obviously if you were to stay at a hotel, they may actually have access to a facility through a gym or maybe even a pool where you can swim some laps. But if you’re in a hotel, or you’re unhappy with the setup of the gym at hotels, yeah there’s still tonnes of things you can do in the room itself.

A couple of things that I could recommend is obviously your general bodyweight stuff. You can still perform the squats. You can still perform your lunges and various variations such as walking lunges. You can try bilateral and unilateral variations of those activities, so the squats you can do your pistols, you can still do your single leg squats. All of that stuff requires minimal to no equipment. You can do your push-ups as well, whether that be on your toes or on your knees. You can do a whole host of core exercise varying from your dead bugs, to your planks, to your crunches, to your supermans, tonnes of things you can do. The key, though, is that I think a lot of people go away and they think; man I usually pump out a whole heap of weights or I usually incorporate some hill sprints and I just don’t have those resources available. The key is to know that the alternative is to really do nothing. By incorporating even just a little bit of exercise, even though it’s not typically what you would do because you’d be working with a whole heap of bodyweight variations, it’s still better than nothing.

The other thing that you could do if you had access to bands or even sliders is you can take those along with you. With the bands, you can do a whole bunch of protraction stuff, you can maybe hook it up somewhere and perform some banded rotations to work on your shoulder. If there was a broomstick there, you can take the broom handle out and you can perform a whole heap of dowel related movements, whether that be some real cool stuff like dowel power shrugs or dowel snatches, things to that effect. But again, you can also do a whole bunch of mobility based work with your shoulder joint and the pectoral girdle. In addition to that, though, the sliders I mentioned, you don’t even necessarily need sliders, you just need paper plates and if you’ve got paper plates, you can put those down onto the floor and you can get down as though you are going to perform a push-up and you can slowly move your arms away and perform a paper plated version of a chest fly as an example. Or you could even drop down onto your back and you could get into a similar position that you would adopt if you were going to be doing leg curls utilising a Swiss ball, and you can pop your feet onto the paper plats and slowly drag those in and out while in that bridge position.

So, a whole host of things you can do, Alex, there’s no need for you to get too bent out of shape with that one. Stick with your bodyweight stuff, incorporate a whole bunch of banded stuff, if you’ve got access to paper plates, throw those in.

There is literally hundreds of things that you can do. So give that a go next time you’re away working in your hotel room and see if it works for you.

Until next time, team, keep safe and, as always, keep an eye out for more content.

Disclaimer: The exercises and information provided by Fit Futures Learning Institute (T/A Fit Futures Academy) (www.fitfutures.co.nz) are for educational and entertainment purposes only, and are not to be interpreted as a recommendation for a specific treatment plan, product or course of action. Read the full content disclaimer.